See also: Beef
Where can I buy fresh or frozen Kobe beef?

Wagyu Beef
Wagyu Beef
Wagyu Beef
Wagyu Beef
Where to get Wagyu Beef
Comments

2017 Mar 28
A wall of texts in multiple posts.

2017 Mar 28
It's like talking to a wall.

2017 Mar 28
Well yes, my reading comprehension could be improved and maybe my expectations are unrealistic. I am sure calling beef Prime Rib and not having to disclose it as an inferior cut is a convenient coincidence for the beef industry and lobbyists. Good job lobbyists. Keep the public stupid.

But I would like to know what I am buying whether it is a Prime or AAA cut. I have had staff at Farm Boy and Metro tell me their Prime Rib is Prime beef or AAA is the same as Prime. But if I talk to the butcher they tell me they only sell AAA and they don't carry Prime graded beef. When I lived in the USA the retail stores have to label their beef with regard to quality as per USDA guidelines. The guidelines I have found out are much looser in Canada with regard to labeling. A butcher in the US would never call a rib roast prime if it were choice graded.

In Canada I guess we just have to assume Prime Rib is not Prime beef. The Keg has a very good non Prime Rib. The waitress will tell me it's Prime graded but their corporate head quarters says it is AA or AAA and not Prime graded.

Buyer beware.

2017 Mar 28
6471, you need to work on your reading comprehension. Prime rib is a cut of beef, a standing rib roast cut from the best part of the rib section. The name predates the current grading system. The "prime" part of the name does in no way refer to grading or marbling. You can buy a prime rib roast that is A, AA, AAA or Prime and it will always be a prime rib roast. The fact that it is called "prime" rib and that there is a grade of beef called "prime" is a coincidence.

2017 Mar 28
No, the previous post did not infer that Prime is not a grade. What he said flat out, as I did, is that reference to standing rib roasts as "prime" rib has nothing to do with the grade of the beef, but that it is cut from the primal rib.

As such, your expectation that "prime rib" always be Prime beef is unreasonable. And as I said, the USDA explicitly says that prime rib does NOT need to be Prime.

2017 Mar 27
Wow. Sounds like a retailer splitting hairs. The previous post inferred Prime is not a grade which it is. If a restaurant or retailer sells a steak called Prime Rib I have an expectation it is a prime cut. The USDA does regulate the difference in the quality of cuts of meat. This requires a USDA inspector verifying the cut as Prime, Choice or a lesser quality. The packaged beef at the store is shown as Choice or Prime. After reviewing the Canadian laws, we do not have this requirement at the package level. Its the Wild Wild West for labeling in Canada.

It's how honest you want to be with your customers. When I go to Mortons in North America I know it's Prime cut. Many steak houses and retailers sell less than Prime although it says Prime Rib on the menu or in the counter. A number of butchers in Ottawa tell me their labeled Prime Rib is AAA because they don't carry Prime beef. Sasloves does sell AAA Rib and Prime Rib. What should they call their Prime Rib to distinguish from AAA Rib? Prime Prime Rib.

2017 Mar 27
He didn't say that prime wasn't a grade, just that the grading has nothing to do with prime rib. USDA regulations specifically say that prime rib doesn't need to be prime. That's because the "prime" in rib in reference to a standing rib roast refers to the fact that the cut comes from the rib primal.

2017 Mar 27
Kobe certified steak from Japan. Check out the marbling. Restaurants sell it for $50 an ounce in Canada and $25 an ounce in the USA. Only 3 restaurants in Canada and 11 restaurants in the USA authorized. See comments below.

2017 Mar 27
Wagyu steak from Japan rated A5 from Costco USA. $1200.00. 12 pounds.

2017 Mar 27
Attached is the photo of the Canadian Beef Assiciation showing the grades of Canadian beef.

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2007 Mar 7
Pretty sure I've seen packs of Kobe beef the Saslove's in the Market - last seen about 3 months ago when I was last there, but presumably they know a producer/importer and could order it in if they don't currently have it in stock. Dunno if it's "real" kobe beef, or "kobe style" beef - not sure what the rules are for "real" kobe beef...





2007 Sep 26
They have a flat-iron steak cut of Kobe here on the dinner menu. It's from Snake River Farms which is a fairly large producer of American Wagyu.

www.snakeriverfarms.com



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2007 Sep 26
They have Kobe Meatloaf here. At ~$20 I'm not sure whether it was actually "Kobe", or just American Wagyu. A satisfying portion but no better than any other meatloaf I've tried in my life.



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2007 Sep 26
I had a Kobe Burger for lunch here one day. It's good for what it is, but I can't justify the $20 pricetag. I'd rather eat at Licks 2-3 times...




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2008 Oct 1
Real Kobe beef is supposed to be extremely marbled. That's the whole point of Kobe beef. What you had at Hilton Lac Leamy is probably American Wagyu which has been cross bred with Angus. This will be leaner than true Kobe beef which is fatty. One of the conditions of Kobe beef actually, is that is has to have a marbling index (BMS) of over 6 (between 6 and 12 which is the highest with over 50% marbling). USDA doesn't even go above a 7 in the marbling index, so true Kobe beef can't even be compared to American beef (Angus) or American Wagyu.

2008 Oct 1
Forget the rest of the vendors listed, I guarantee they won't compare. If you want a serious taste of what Kobe beef should taste like, take a trip to L'Arome, located in the basement at the Hilton Lac Leamy in Hull QC. The best steak I've ever had. A 4oz cut will run you ~$40, and an 8oz costs ~$75, but well worth it. The service is sensational. If you're into surf and turf, there is a seafood platter that is to die for as well.

My fiance and I discovered L'Arome a couple of years ago, and when we visited Vegas a while back, we searched for a restaurant that served Kobe so we could compare. We found a high end steak house in Caesars that boasted an amazing Kobe...at $20/oz. My fiance ordered a 10oz cut, and without exaggeration, it was the single worst experience with a steak I've ever had. In comparison, I would rather eat at The Keg. It was extremely marbled and greasier than a McDonald's patty.

Moral of this story: Forget the price tag, try it.