DAVIDsTEA Perfect Spoon [Food/Vendor]

Jan 18
In my recent comments about Kusmi Tea, I expressed some frustration with the so-called "Perfect Spoon" that DAVIDsTEA uses to provide brewing instructions for their tea. Rather than using grams or teaspoons, they declare the number of Perfect Spoons ("PS") you need to use for your tea. The end result being that customers are forced to purchase a $7 spoon along with the tea.

Being a resourceful chap, I thought to myself, "No problemo! I'll just google Perfect Spoon and find out how much it holds." Guess what? PROBLEMO!

Some sources say 1 PS is 1.25 or 1.5 tsp, others say 2.5 tsp. Even the DAVIDsTEA blog is inconsistent with itself: blog.davidstea.com

You can see for yourself on that page. First they say, "Not familiar with our Perfect Spoon? This brilliant little teaspoon is our measuring standard to[sic] making a cup of tea. It holds 1.25 tsp of tea..."

Then at the bottom of the chart below that, they say: "1 Perfect Spoon = 2.5 tsp, 2 Perfect Spoons = 5 tsp or 1.5 tbsp" A tweet from the official DAVIDsTEA account supports this 2.5 tsp number.

If you own one of these spoons, would you be willing to answer this question once and for all? The ideal method would involve filling the PS with water and weighing that water on a scale having 1 gram or better accuracy. The resulting number tells us how many mL the PS holds (5 g water = 5 mL = 1 tsp).

Jan 18
When I get home I will if someone hasn't already.

Jan 20
I have one at my desk, but no measuring spoons to compare it with. But it clearly looks to be much closer to a tbsp than a tsp, so I'll go with the 2.5 tsp figure.

Jan 20
I'm holding out for the Perfect Spork.

Jan 22
The Perfect Spoon measuring device is a wonderfully cromulent system.

Jan 22
Crud, forgot this thread. Just tested. 2.5 tea spoons of volume

Jan 23
I think you mean 'Perfect volume (tm)'.

Jan 23
Does it take a Perfect Spoon™ (and Perfect Teapot™ and Perfect Cup™ etc.) to make a Perfect Cup of Tea™ ?


Jan 24
Are they owned by Apple? Because then it would make sense.